Sales Report – February 2019

We are providing monthly sales reports for our community marketplace in the spirit of transparency.

February’s sales were a lower than January’s $275.75, but March is shaping up to be stronger in the first half, we will see how March finishes. In the meantime here are February’s figures.

All in all we are only 2 1/2 months into our new marketplace and it is exciting to see any sales happening already! As a community we are growing and learning how to market our stores and our marketplace together. Good things are happening and I personally look forward to the months ahead. I am very motivated to see our vendors receiving sales and being rewarded for their hard work and quality offerings.

This post is an update to our fundition project

$206.02 total sales

In February our vendors saw $206.02 in total sales, priced in USD. This number is excluding shipping.

Breakdown by currency

CurrencyTotal%
STEEM$54.5626.48%
SBD$3.991.94%
USD$147.4771.58%
Total$206.02100%

23 orders were paid for

This equates to an average order order value of $8.96

42 items purchased

A total of 42 items were included in those 23 transactions.

The average number of items per order is 1.8 items per order.

100% of the profit is retained

True to our mission to seek empowerment over profit, 100% of funds transferred between customer and vendor are safely in the vendors’ hands.

We are not middlemen in the transactions, so we never touched any of the funds, nor did we take any commission. In fact Homesteaders Co-op was bypassed completely during financial transactions between customer and vendor – this is by design.

Previous Sales Reports

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This is an update to our fundition project: Free Community Marketplace for Handmade Goods in STEEM/SBD

‐ @sagescrub

Homesteaders – Living Naturally, Newsletter. 13th March 2019

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Welcome back for the second newsletter! The first one was well received and supported. I’d like to extend my thanks to my daughter, @svitlaangel, and to @riverflows for their ideas and designs to come up with a name and logo for the newsletter.

Things happening in the community.

@pennsif‘s Homesteaders and Preppers list is filling out nicely again. Some countries and continents are yet to be represented and some are only sparsely represented, but I hope to see more coming in. The list has relocated to the @altlife account, where you can also find information on the radio show and other alternative lifestyle communities on Steem.

A comment was made on one of the Homesteaders and Preppers list posts, indicating that they weren’t sure if they quite reached the criteria for being added to the list. This once again raised the question, for me, if there is such a thing as a criterion. @riverflows has posted a couple of times about whether we make assumptions upon what makes a homesteader. I feel that if the interest is there, then connecting with other like-minded people shouldn’t require criteria. What are your thoughts on this, dear reader?

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At @naturalmedicine there are some highlights up from the week. The challenge which sparked some of these posts has been extended for the last entries to be in today. So if you’re really quick and inspired, you could sneak one in. Otherwise, keep an eye on their page for future challenges.

Welcoming Newcomers

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New to Steem is @herbncrypto who likes to grow and create. I hope we can make him feel welcome.

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Also, @warfsterveld is a homesteader who joined last month. Some may have already met them, but we all know how slow going things are at the start so I felt them deserving of a highlight.

Some highlights of the week

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@wildhomesteading is capturing my interest again; this time with suggestions for perennial root crops. Set and forget types of plants are definitely right up my alley. Read more about it here.

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@ligayagardener gives a tour of his aquaponics system from start to finish. He talks about how he started small growing from there and mentions the little tweaks made along the way to improve efficiency. Watch the video here.

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You may have read that there’s a push to get more accounts to minnow status on the site at the moment. One of the accounts chosen belongs to homesteader @squishysquid. This is her post for that minnow push, in which she tells us about it and includes her helpful video on trimming goat hoofs. Read and watch all about it here.

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I had to share this one from our new arrival @herbncrypto. What amazing skill and creativity in making both his own and his wife’s wedding bands! Read how he did it here.

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We can’t go without a recipe, so here’s something a bit different from @leylar with biscuits which add a new flavour using pumpkin seed flour.

Thank you for stopping by. This week’s newsletter was brought to you by @minismallholding.

Earthship Chronicles eBook by @eco-alex – Making this world a better place

I am honored that @eco-alex has joined Homesteaders Co-op as a vendor. He has added so much value to the steem blockchain and in his communities offline as well. Alex has brought his book to our marketplace which chronicles his adventure in creating his own Earthship. He shares his knowledge and lessons learned about natural building and living self-sufficiently.

It is quite fitting that @eco-alex is selling Earthship Chronicles in Homesteaders Co-op, because he is helping empower people to be more self sufficient, resilient and re-connecting with their natural environment through their living space.

@eco-alex is also the founder of @ecoTrain, a Steem Community dedicated to making the world a better place through positive actions, sharing knowledge, inspiring others via a weekly online Magazine. You can learn more about ecoTrain here.

@eco-alex now accepts STEEM, SBD and USD for Earthship Chronicles

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In his own words (borrowed from their Homesteaders Co-op store):

The magical tale of a man who self built his self sufficient luxurious earthship home with no experience or training.

If you are thinking about one day building your own eco-home or want to live off-grid and be self-sufficient, then this book is written for you! Welcome to the start of this journey and sharing.

This Book is about many things. It is a fantastic learning opportunity as I explain the most important concepts and ideas you need to know so you can understand how Earthship Biotecture works, and how Earthships are able to perform so well with little to no maintenance or bills. I also cover the thoughts and considerations that I had to make whilst building Earthship Karuna; including the technical aspects of building with my own pictures and of course many wonderful stories!

I share what I have learned through my own experiences of eco-building. I have learned a lot during my first and subsequent builds and will offer you my best advice and ideas for you to be able to fulfil your eco-building dreams. Anyone who has embarked on the journey of self-building will know that it is a long and often challenging journey. Whilst it may not be easy, it has taken me on a new path that has gifted me with so many things, not least real security and a truly comfortable home and lifestyle for a lifetime!

As this story unfolds, you will come to know that living in an Earthship or self-sufficient home is about many things. It is not just an ethical choice or a building type choice, it is also a lifestyle choice. When you start to live off-grid, and self-sufficiently, you embark on a break out from the matrix/zeitgeist. You start to unplug yourself from the normal, dependent, vulnerable, and highly controlled way of life that many people are used to in cities and highly developed countries. When you are truly self-sufficient and out of debt you take away some of the main sources of stress: buying food, paying the bills, covering the mortgage or rent, and needing to work full-time to allow this to continue. We can also look at environmental issues and great need to build smarter and in a more connected way, especially in the face of climate change. Our global population is rising and with it the poverty level and inequality of wealth in all forms. To compound this issue, the cost of living is also hurtling up! We are moving toward a very unsafe and unsustainable future if we continue to build and live in the same way that we have been doing.

You can browse @eco-alex‘s products at: Alex Leor’s Homesteaders Co-op Store

@eco-alex is based out of United Kingdom and his eBook can be downloaded anywhere! (Homesteaders Co-op is an international marketplace)

Vendor Introduction: Catharsiopa Alchemical Products and Artistry (@Ravenking13) Now Listing on Homesteaders Co-Op!

@ravenking13 is now listing their beautiful spagyric inspired tincture ‘Rose Flower & Hips – Secret Home’! Even the product description is alluring – ‘A Guide to the Secret Chamber of the Heart’. Looking at some the gorgeous alchemical products @ravenking13 writes about on his blog, I’m super excited about this one!

@ravenking13 writes of his elixirs:

All of my elixirs and products are handcrafted in small batches predominantly for my own private use and as part of the alchemical art projects documented here on the site. Made with great care and intention. All of my ingredients are natural (and locally sourced whenever possible) and contain no chemical additives or preservatives. Because of this, there may be variations in the products. The herbs I use are all organic, either from my own garden or bought. Each elixir is unique and a one time product, taking at the very least a month of work from start to finish to prepare. I only make Elixirs with which I personally work, exploring the alchemical art, their uses and as tools for soul, spirit and body evolution.

@ravenking13 now accepts steem, SBD and USD.

You can browse their store and look for new listings at: Catharsiopa on HomesteadersCoop. Keep an eye on this one – there are plans for new listings soon!

@ravenking13 is based out of Luxembourg and ships internationally! (Homesteaders Co-op is an international marketplace)

Calling Global Homesteaders: Are You One, And Didn’t Know It?

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Hey, it’s @riverflows here, writing from the Antipodes or down under, as some folks know it. You know, before I joined Steemit, I only had a very stereotypical idea of what a homesteader was. To me, it was definitely an Americanism, something that conjured a Little House on the Prairie type scenario or preppers with guns and big stocks of food ready to ward off an apocalypse. I’d lived in England for a while, where I got used to the term ‘smallholding’ which was the British equivalent, but still, I only had a vague idea of what either of these things meant. And one day, we bought a 5 acre property in rural Australia (not so rural we had to ride kangaroos to work, but rural enough to be cautious on roads at dawn and dusk) and people started asking me questions. Are we self sufficient? Do we have a vegie patch? Do we have animals? I realised whatever life we were trying to live – conscious of the earth, willing to gain a little food sovereignty, adhere to sustainable values – came with a kind of label attached to it.

I still don’t know what that is, but I relate to this ‘homesteader’ tag on Steemit alot. To me it’s about folk who want to live sustainable lifestyles, grow their own food, make their own herbal medicines. You don’t need to live on a ranch or thousands of acres to be one, and you sure as hell don’t need to be an expert either. You can be an urban homesteader, growing tomatoes and grapes and raising quail in inner city Melbourne. You can have a verandah on a tiny block growing plants in containers. You can have an aquaponics system in the middle of the desert or a disused parking lot. You might even just support homesteaders by buying their produce at farmers markets and taking it home to pickle it yourself, or be into wildcrafting and foraging weeds and mushrooms on the weekend. You might be doing aid work on a farm in Lombok, learning about indigenous medicines in South America, or about to start a herbal medicine course in Tasmania. You might have grown up on a farm in South Africa. You might be have an allotment seasonally in Wales. You might distil lavender oil in your shed in France.

This is exactly what @minismallholding (a fellow Aussie) said in her newsletter yesterday (did you see it?):

While the title says Homesteaders, the community branches into so many different areas. Whether you’re a backyard gardener or living on acres, interested in natural living and medicines or prepping, crafting, DIY and food preparation, interests and communities all interlink and are welcoming and I’m sure you’ll find something of interest to you and a place for you.

Anyone can identify with this tag and we’re encouraging you to join in the conversation about homesteading practices on Steemit, whether you have a huge property or a tiny backyard, an island in the South Pacific (lucky you) or raise bees the top of a high rise building in a huge city.

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Saying that, the vast majority of homesteaders on Steemit, according to @pennsif‘s lovingly compiled list released this week (which you can find here) ARE from the U.S, and a large proportion in Canada too. I’ve been having fun thinking about why this is. Perhaps it is just an identification thing, or perhaps Steemit isn’t as well known in other countries. I’d love to meet more homesteaders from Africa, from Australia or from Europe. Upon reading this article, if you’ve changed your mind about whether or not you’re a homesteader (and hey, maybe we all have at least a littlehomesteader in us), please get in touch – go look at @pennsif‘s list, befriend some good folk, and get to know us. We’d love to have you as part of this community, wherever you come from.

Of course, the eventual outcome of this is more listings on the Homesteaders Co-Op website, which would truly be amazing. I’m going to follow @quochuy‘s lead in listing some things soon, as my hops is about to be harvested and I’m thinking about putting together an E-Book on how to make your own wicking beds. I’m so excited about getting more Australian listings on Homesteaders Co-Op, and hope that many more countries follow suite!

Introducing @minismallholding and the Return of the Homesteading Newsletter.

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Hi all, @minismallholding here. I live in suburban Adelaide, South Australia and like to homestead in miniature on our little plot. I’m learning as I go and trying to get used to a completely different climate as I spent the first 32 years of my life in England. I came to Steemit to share my learning experiences, but it has become so much more of a community in so many more ways than I would have ever imagined.

When I landed on Steemit, in July 2017, I was lucky to get spotted and welcomed onboard with a newly gathering homesteading and prepping community. @pennsif was putting together a list of like-minded people so we could connect with one another, @greenacrehome formed Homesteaders Online and @kiaraantonoviche put out a weekly homesteading newsletter. Sadly, not everyone could keep up with commitments and the banner was passed on with the formation of the Global Homestead Collective, @ghscollective #ghsc, and later projects like @homesteaderscoop and @naturalmedicine.

Recently @pennsif pulled out the old homesteaders and preppers list and it was sad to see so many familiar names which have gone inactive. Kiara was one who moved on to other things in life and it seems that I wasn’t the only one to have missed her newsletters. So @sagescrub has invited me to resurrect the newsletter in a new home at the Homesteaders Co-op. I’m both nervous and excited to be coming on board with some amazing contributors and hope I can do it justice.

Voluntary Exchanges on the Homesteader’s Co-op – Interview with Ben, The Liberty Hippie, of Homesteads and Homeschools

In January I recorded a podcast interview with Ben of Homesteads and Homeschools and it was just released this week. Ben is also known as @bpangie, The Liberty Hippy, here in steem. I really enjoyed the interview with Ben. He is a good guy and a smart fellow and his podcast is doing a great service. I recommend subscribing to his podcast if you like this interview.

This is the first interview that I’ve done whose audience is not folks on steem. Although inevitably some of Ben’s audience may come from steem, many do not. And so it has been a perfect opportunity for us to get our message about Homesteaders Co-op, as well as steem, to folks that may not have heard of steem yet. I believe this interview makes a good first impression not only of Homesteaders Co-op, but also of steem.

I shared more of the background story about how Homesteaders Co-op got started and how the initial idea was born. I didn’t leave much out – so you may just learn more about our beginnings! I also shared how our steem communities have inspired our project.

I’ve transcribe the interview below for anyone that would rather read than listen. It is also nice to have this message in text format that we can use in part or in whole for our outreach efforts.

This post is an update to our fundition project

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Voluntary Exchanges on the Homesteader’s Co-op – Episode #005

Direct mp3 download
Link to episode 5 on Libsyn.

Ben: Alright so today we have Noel who runs the homesteaderscoop.com. You’ll find him on steemit under @homesteaderscoop among another name he may give you here in a little bit (@sagescrub). He is out on the west coast getting this website setup for us and he’s to tell us a little bit about that today. Its pretty interesting. I think its something we can all take something from and learn something on top of the idea of community here. So Noel, welcome to the show here.

Hi Ben, thanks for having me.

Yeah no prob, thanks for coming on – I appreciate it. What are you doing now? What’s your setup right now? You got a little bit of a garden, homestead…

Yeah, so my partner and I are in Southern Oregon and we are doing a half rent, half care taking for the property we are living on in exchange for a home and garden space. So it allows us to garden while we are looking for our long term place. I grew up in suburbia so homesteading is not in my upbringing.

I grew up in the country. I’ve lived in country and city. Suburbia is one of those things I couldn’t get a grasp on it. You weren’t close enough to have the amenities you do in the city but you’re not spaced out enough where you can enjoy a little bit of quiet and solitude. Suburbia was always tough for me. So what are you guys gardening or how big of a garden do you have right now?

Well our garden is.. how would I quantify it? Its pretty decent size but its also not huge. We are in the same spot we were in last year and we grew pretty much a little bit of everything like potatoes and carrots and greens and a lot of herbs and my partner is into flower farming and I am into perennials. Looking ahead for our future property, or even just sharing with friends I am starting a lot of trees from seed because they take so long to produce. That’s my long term focus. Short term focus is growing and wild-crafting as much of our food as we can.

Very cool. Are you guys hoping to stay in that area or are you open to moving around some?

Oh yeah we love it here because there’s a lot of like minded people and a lot of older back-to-the-landers from the 80’s and 90’s that we look up to and respect. There’s a lot of modern day hippies that live around here. So there’s a whole wide range of community that we can relate to. Its kinda funny, because I went wwoofing for a few years and I was seeking out Permaculture homesteads that I could learn from and contribute to and a lot of places that I went I was used to being the weird person or one of the few that was into Permaculture or learning about that. Where I am now people don’t look at me funny when I talk about Permaculture.

Hey you know it works. That’s good stuff. I am sure there’s a bunch of knowledge that can be had from all those folks too. Definitely when you get out there and you’re ding things on your own, having people to learn from is easier to learn from someone than a book or a youtube video.

Yeah growing up I didn’t have this sense of community that I have learned now. And even outside of this community just in general I’ve found the farming and gardening communities are just really welcoming and loving. That’s what really drove me to go in this direction is connecting to people in an industry that’s just all about love and care and nurturing, for the most part. Versus working in a corporate or desk job and you’re helping the people at the top get fatter and its all about competition and greed and scarcity.

Yeah I definitely think there’s a sense of community in terms of the farming world or agricultural world. You’re relying on yourself to get the plants in the ground and at the same time there’s help there and you can help each other. There’s the self reliance and at the same time there’s a little bit more than that. Alright so moving on to the Homesteaders Co-op. Can you tell us a little bit about what that is?

Sure. And maybe I’ll just give a brief introduction how it started. And if you want any clarification just let me know, because in regard to the Steem blockchain which is a social community platform for blogging that’s rewarding cryptocurrency…

Actually I’ll rewind a little further because what my partner and I were thinking of doing a year and a half ago we were considering income opportunities for generating income on the homestead. Actually we’ve been trying quite a few. Last year we started four or five small businesses just to throw feelers out there and Homesteaders Co-op was one of them. A year and a half ago we were thinking about the possibility of doing a paid membership website where we would teach people what we are learning about homesteading coming from a suburban background. From a perspective of someone that didn’t grow up homesteading. And so we liked the idea because we had a lot of people that were interested in – just in friends and family – in what we were going through.

At the same time I stumbled across the Steem website which I had just signed on to and realized there was this really beautiful homesteading community on there. And so I thought that would be a great place to do a proof of concept and try out some ideas before going out there and building a business and a website. And so I started blogging and it was just a really beautiful experience because I was welcomed by this homesteading community and gardening community and permaculture communities on that platform that really encouraged me. Encouraged me to grow in a lot of ways, in terms of the way I communicate and communicating more from the heart, which is really beautiful in contrast to our dominant culture which encourages you to communicate from a place of fear and scarcity. After that I realized I don’t really need to create a website because here’s this blogging platform where I feel really part of the community and really encouraged to share. And I’m already being rewarded in cryptocurrency, which is not necessarily going to make a living but its encouraging me to keep sharing. And so I did.

Fast forward another half a year later, last summer, my partner and I decided to start a seed business focused on Permaculture and wildcrafting. And a long term goal for the seed business was to share perennial seeds. The short term goal was – I mean we don’t own property, and we have a temporary garden space right now, and we were in the middle of summer. But we didn’t want to let that hold us back from starting the business and just give it a shot and throw it out there and see what happens.

In terms of working with what we had and the seeds we were passionate about, we put together a small seed catalog focused on food, medicine and beauty. And we call it Seeds of Abundance because its plants that produce abundantly through food, medicine and beauty – and also seeds. And there’s a wild aspect to it. We were really inspired by Fukuoka who wrote One Straw Revolution. And just really inspired to garden more naturally. So the seed business was inspired by that. We decided to launch it and sell it for cryptocurrency for steem currency. Because we felt encouraged by our community and we felt in a lot of ways its very idealistic – its very free. There’s no transaction fees, there’s no one taking a cut of the transaction. So we thought, well, it’s kind of like mother nature and its kinda like seeds so it goes hand in hand. And seeds are meant to be free, as far as nature is concerned.

And yeah, sorry I am rambling, but just to summarize a little more and get back to Homesteaders Co-op. I started working on that website and I have a background in web design and programming before I got into homesteading. So I dusted that off and worked on a website and found a way to accept payments for the cryptocurrency. So my partner said “Hey, all that work you put in, why don’t you share that with other people?” And I thought oh my gosh, that’s a beautiful idea because not only can I share the work I’ve done and encourage other people to sell their products in this community market format, but also… So yeah, I decide to share it and went to work on expanding it to be a marketplace for homesteaders. So that’s how the idea was born. Its actually evolved so much from there.

Yeah its definitely shaped up. I looked at it a couple months ago is when it came to my first attention and talking to you. Its grown! I remember seeing a handful of vendors on there and now there’s quite a number. Do you guys… so its not just STEEM right? I can use US dollars or is it just cryptocurrency at this point?

We started with just STEEM and then we expanded to dollars. Interesting thing about that… well our vendors are accepting PayPal or credit cards through PayPal, but originally we were just using STEEM. And originally it was going to be more of a business. I was going to charge a monthly fee in order to operate. I was considering that or commissions. But at a certain point around the time we were beta testing or shortly after that I had a problem charging a fee to vendors because first of all its going to be a while before we have a lot of sales. And I know that’s going to be money out of pocket for our vendors. And most homesteaders are on a shoestring budget so its a contradiction.

I had a big ethical dilemma early on and there’s that whole part of me that was trained for greed and profit from a young age that was contradicting the ideals of wanting to share something beautiful with a community. For a little bit there I was in a really tough spot emotionally and ideologically. Finally decided that I was inspired enough to keep working on it and give it away for free without charging commissions.

I realized that I really wanted to embody sharing this with my friends and community and see where it goes and follow the inspiration and if one day I don’t find a way to make it work sustainably, I can always charge fees later. But in the meantime, I was letting that passion for sharing drive me forward.

The beautiful thing that came out of that – a lot of things but – in terms of transactions, we didn’t have to be a middleman in transactions, so our website is basically a venue and it creates a venue for customers to find vendors and purchase a product. Once the customer goes through to purchase the product, the transaction goes through directly from the customer to the vendor. That’s both with STEEM and PayPal. We never touch that money. Its a lot more private, its a lot more secure. If our website ever gets hacked, there’s not passwords or private keys to be stolen. The vendors and customers take that responsibility on themselves.

I think its a lot more rewarding and empowering for people to transact just like they do in the farmers market because when you got to a farmers market and buy some veggies from a farmer, there’s not a market manager coming in the middle saying “Hey, hand that money over and I’ll take 3%”, or whatever, before it gets to the vendor. That’s the way that e-commerce works in the case of etsy and amazon and everybody else. They take the transaction. It makes sense because they have to be sustainable, but it creates the culture of profit being the first driving priority, which eventually evolves into a money hungry company if it grows big enough, that’s only caring about the vendors or customers that are making them a lot of money.

So for example – what we are doing helps to alleviate problems, like edge case – the little guys that are being ignored, for example we have vendor outside United States that can’t use etsy anymore because etsy stopped allowing international withdrawals by paypal. And they only make a few sales a month and so they have to use a wire transfer to get their money since they can’t use PayPal and the wire transfer eats up all their profit. So its like, there’s no point. Unless, you know, they have to look at it another way – they’re forced to get bigger. That’s what everybody does, they focus on the profit because that’s what is encouraged.

And that’s one of the things that struck me about this. More acts as a facilitator between the two different parties. It lets you do your business on your own and theres nobody gets in the middle demanding that you adhere to XYZ. That’s one of the things I thought was unique and interesting. Along the lines of decentralization and the whole idea of the blockchain and make things more personal. That’s something I really appreciate, seeing that people can actually get along and do things voluntarily and not be forced into paying exhorbitant fees just to get your own money.

Yeah there’s a lot of experimentation going on just in general in blockchain and a lot of it is really exciting because without less control and less force being in the picture, we are or we can be a lot more inspired and follow our ideals without feeling fear. There’s a lot of new territory so there’s a lot of experimentation going on and we’re glad to be a part of it. Just following that model as we evolve our community, community is following that model as well and opening up to having less control in terms of the structure and how we operate. So we have contributors that are helping to run our blog and market our community marketplace and as we go along its becoming more of a community feeling and less of a company feeling.

Part of that evolution is operating in a hybrid gift economy. We will be creating more opportunities for gifting and purchasing by donating or giving gifts away for free. In terms of sustainability we’re going to be exploring ethical advertising and gifting advertising to companies that we believe offer value to our marketplace and our customers, rather than putting whatever pays the most in front of their face and saying this is what we want you to click on. I like the idea of choosing advertisers that can offer real value and asking them to contribute something in terms of knowledge or information and we can say we really believe in what they are doing and their ethics align with our ethics. Those are all things we will be exploring in terms of different ways of feeling rewarded, compensated. Its really inspired a lot by gifting that is happening on the steem blockchain. Its very much inline with what you might see in your family or tight group of friends, gifting each other things because they love each other or they care for one another. Maybe a close group of gardeners. And we see sharing seeds and silver rounds and care packages and things like that. Its not for money – its for the joy of giving and the joy of seeing the excitement of those things being received. So we want to encourage more of that, but at the end of the day people have to make a living too. So its not like we want to live in a false world where its only ideals. Obviously there’s the money aspect, so we want to encourage both sides of things and not just be in a black and white, cut and dried world where things are all about profit.

Yeah, I think that’s something there. Because you do, you have to make money to get buy. But at the same time, you fill in little holes, whether its bartering or gifts. Or things like steemit… you said earlier you’re not going to make a living off it, but its something. Have ways to fill those little holes can be really helpful. If you go buy seeds for your garden, you’re going to drop 50 bucks, 100 bucks on seeds depending where you get them from. So if you can find a way to trade for those or get them from someone else instead of a big company, corporation that does all that. I appreciate that. So why don’t you tell us a little bit about what products they have. Homesteaders Co-op, you guys talked a little about perennials seeds, what else you got going on there?

Good point, thanks for reminding me, that’s the exciting part. Oh yeah and first of all, its an international marketplace. Like a lot of the blockchains, we are opening to crossing borders. We have over 20 vendors now in 8 different countries. Roughly half of that is in the United States. And the other half are spread across countries like Australia, Canada, Mexico, Spain –

Speaking of Spain we had a couple vendors join us that started a women’s Co-op in Spain and I was really excited to hear about it because they are all single mom’s living in an eco-village living as sustainable as possible, as close to zero waste as possible, supporting each other. But they don’t have a lot of opportunities in the local market because they live in kind of impoverished area. So they are really grateful to have a place to sell to a larger audience.

So you have people like that that are selling internationally, then you have folks that are selling within their own country. And you have all kind of mixtures, so we’re just leaving it open. The vendors specify where they ship to, how much their shipping costs are and what kind of products they offer which can be virtual downloadable products – for example…

We have one vendor in Canada that has an e-book for raising chickens and its quite in-depth e-book and its only $8 and it teaches you everything you need to know about raising chickens. And we have physical products. We have like you said, seeds, people selling honey. Actually two vendors selling honey in the United States and in Portugal. And we have a couple vendors selling naturally dyed clothing using herbal dyes – and they are really beautiful. We have someone making handmade pouches and purses and a natural wreath maker from homegrown flowers. And much more than that as well.

And we have a lot of people excited to vend as well and a lot of people are signing up. So we are growing fairly quickly. But I am also just appreciating this opportunity because we definitely want to get the word out there more, for growing more. But we don’t want to grow too big because we want to stick to the homesteaders niche, because we don’t want to be the next etsy or grow in that direction of getting as big as we can. We want to find that nice balance of growing so there’s a thriving economy, but not getting so big so that that it causes us to sacrifice our ideals.

But that’s the other thing in terms of decentralizing and being inspired to decentralize into a community effort versus a top down pyramid, I’ve been inspired to want to share our website with other marketplaces. We are still building a solid base for our website, but I’ve been looking for opportunities and the right individuals to share our website with. For example I would love to see a community driven artists co-op that is enabling artists to sell their artwork. Or a handmade toy marketplace. I am sure there’s lots of opportunities. So instead of trying to be everything, it would be really cool to enable other community driven marketplaces. And being community driven, they could really have the opportunity to thrive.

Yeah, one of my thoughts going through my head – you have the homesteaders thing, but you can break that up and share it out. Because its community based – I am sure there’s communities all over.. all sorts of things that I might not be interested in, but someone else is interested in. That’s the beauty of having it be so specific. You’re passionate about this. So if I am making basketballs, you might not be that interested in it, but someone else can do it. The community and culture can build around this. That’s what I like about the idea, the specificity of it and who it speaks to.

Yeah, it would be great to see that happen and then have a distributed network of marketplaces that are autonomous by their own communities. But even those marketplaces can form a larger community that all support each other, rather than supporting the guys at the top. It could be a more – decentralized is a good word. Its interesting because, actually before I even got into this whole stuff and several years back I was gardening, before I was into homesteading. And I was swapping seeds with my neighbor and I thought there is a really big need for a peer to peer marketplace for sharing seeds online and having different opportunities for sharing seeds out there. There’s well known seed companies. There’s a few website where people can share seeds but they’re not really user friendly or even well known. I never explored the idea but recently after putting my seeds on this marketplace and another vendor started putting their seeds, and actually some really cool seeds, and getting sales. Another vendor said they want to share their seeds and it just donned on me.. this could be that website, even though it wasn’t intended to be. It could be a peer to peer seed selling and swapping website. And I am really excited about seeing if it evolves in that direction because having things be more open is cool because the community can decide which way it goes. I am sure there’s a lot of opportunities that I haven’t even thought of yet that can come up in the future.

Yeah, lots of growth potential there. That’s exiting to watch. It will be fun to watch it grow. I wish I had the time to get involved…

But you already are! I appreciate you so much!

Yeah, no problem. So before I let you go, is there anything we didn’t get to about the Homesteaders Co-op that you want to let people know?

Oh yeah, well first of all the website is homesteaderscoop.com – that’s just one word, no dashes. And check it out because there’s some cool stuff on there. If it is interesting to you, subscribe or come back. We are going to have more vendors and more products in the future. And if you really find value in it we do have a crowdfunding page in fundition. I’d be happy to share the link for your show notes. It also outlines some of our short term goals of where we want to take it in the short term, which could be interesting to read about.

Yeah, we’ll definitely get those links in there. And I was going to ask you earlier if you have a donation page or some way to help fund it. Sounds like you do.

Mmm hmm. And that is helping to fund through steem, other cryptocurrencies like bitcoin or ether and also paypal. I am not really asking for a lot of donations right now, because right now I am feeling that we need to build this and make it really thriving and see where it goes. We’ve only been online for about two months now, but already this month – and January is not over – we’ve already made a couple hundred dollars in sales for our vendors and 100% of that goes straight to our vendors like I was saying. Its really exciting to see that and I’d like to see them rewarded more for their hard work because as most of your audience probably knows, homesteaders are super hard working and always constantly questioning what ideals they want to or don’t want to sacrifice, because at the end of the day there’s only so much time and so much money.

Most of us are homesteading because we believe in the world we want to live and lead and leave to future generations. Right now my drive is empowering and supporting those kind of people – and also getting their products and messages into the hands of people that care about it. I feel that our marketplace and the economy that we are building is not just about the products, its about the message too. We have so much to learn about – I mean… its better to focus on the solutions than the problems, because there are so many problems. There’s a bunch of people here, and probably a lot of people in your audience too, are trying to make the world a better place and doing the best with what we’ve got. That’s why community is so important, because we can’t do it alone. Yeah, that’s our message.

Good deal. I can subscribe to that. Alright, thank you!

This is an update to our fundition project: Free Community Marketplace for Handmade Goods in STEEM/SBD

‐ @sagescrub

Thistleworks Designs – Offering quality handmade items where beauty meets functionality; with a few items of whimsy thrown in just for fun.

I love seeing @thistle-rock‘s store because her offerings are as diverse and unique as her personality, which is full of joy and vibrancy! Her store already has quite a few products but I do believe she has more products of different sorts that will be added in the future so follow her and keep an eye out!

@thistle-rock is a crafter, sewer, knitter, artist, and the list goes on and on! As she says she is a jack of all trades and I love that she does not confine herself or her products, and instead lets the creativity flow! She is currently offering downloadable coloring pages, handmade and sewn apron, tea cozy, placemat and tea towels.

In addition, @thistle-rock offers graphic design services. Specifically she is offering to help you layout your next book that you want to self publish!

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@thistle-rock now accepts STEEM, SBD and USD for handmade items, coloring pages, graphic design services and more!

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In their own words (borrowed from their Homesteaders Co-op store):

I have always considered myself a jack of many arts, master of none, for my interests are many and I am not content to play with only one medium.

From bird houses to painted rocks, home decor to clothing, purses and placemats, aprons and tea towels, colouring books, colouring pages, and more, I invite you to browse my wares, you just might find what you are looking for right here.

I love colour, it sets my blood to tingling. Colour draws me in, captivates me. Whether it be paint, fabric or thread, it whets my appetite and the urge to create burns like a fire within.

I paint, sew, build, mold, draw, design and do needlework…. it is for this reason my arts will always be unique; it is for this reason, you will find the shelves of Thistleworks Designs filled with an eclectic mix of offerings.

You can browse @thistle-rock‘s products at: Thistleworks Designs online shop

@thistle-rock is based out of Canada and ships internationally! (Homesteaders Co-op is an international marketplace)

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Learn more about Thistleworks Designs and browse their products: https://homesteaderscoop.com/store/thistleworks/

silvia beneforti offers artworks and handmade products for a nice lifestyle

We are happy to have the talented artist @silviabeneforti join our international marketplace with handmade artwork, products and printable (downloadable) toys. Downloadable, printable toys are genius and darling! A perfect gift for kids or the child in yourself 😉

I can describe her style as whimsical, cute, gentle, fun, friendly, peaceful and warm. Her artwork is bound to bring joy into your life! 

I really appreciate Silvia bringing lessons her family taught her about sustainability into her life and her work. Aside from growing much of her own food Silvia strives for minimal waste, including using recycled materials, when possible, in her artwork and products.

I personally believe this is the direction we should all be heading and challenging ourselves and our friends to find creative ways to be more sustainable. Bravo Silvia!

@silviabeneforti now accepts STEEM, SBD and USD for artworks and handmade products

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In her own words (borrowed from their Homesteaders Co-op store):

Since I was a child my family has the habit to try to make a positive impact on the environment, because we lived in a small village between many forest where everyone knew how important is to take care of the environment. Now I live in a small city in Tuscany (in the center of Italy), a small green area where everyone can easely lives taking care on the Nature around us. Simple actions that help to make our world better day by day. For example, since I was a child, in my family we have the habit to reduce the trash in different way: we buy just durable things (no throwaway plates and forks, for example), to re-use and recycle the most part of the things. Thanks to my father who has a large garden, we can eat veggies all the years, our own veggies. I use a similar approach also in the most part of my creative works, for example I love to recycle the cardboard boxes to give them a new life in form of sculptures or like a surface to paint. In my shop you’ll find some of my artworks inspiring by animals (paintings on paper or little sculptures), some of my handmade pocket journals featuring my own illustration and a lot of different things, all of them made by my hand in my own lab-house and using different materials I find in my area.

You can browse @silviabeneforti‘s products at: Homesteaders Co-op

@silviabeneforti is based out of Tuscany, Italy and ships internationally! (Homesteaders Co-op is an international marketplace)

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Learn more about silvia beneforti and browse her products: https://homesteaderscoop.com/store/vumap/

Recipe for Success: Tell the world about your passions…

Imagine a world where everyone can follow their passions without fear of being shamed. A world where people don’t have to shy away from doing what they truely like to do, because there would be no judgment. Imagine a world where no one says that a life of art or music, or any other kind, is near impossible.

I see it as a world where happiness is the norm. Where competition is only existant to further grow our spirit. A world where people are free to think.

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We have normalized an extremely boring way of life. Though there has always been the exception of a few marginalpeople here and there, the packaged lifestyle that seems to become main stream on every continent, with the same programing coming out of the soap box, has a newly awekened competitor!!!

This competitor I’m talking about is this wave of folks finally understanding (myself included) that happiness lies in being free to let your passions play out.

Maybe… Don’t quit your day job just yet!

I love to hear stories of people dropping out of their current life to follow their passions. They typically give it everything they’ve got and the stories are almost always full of joy and ease. While these stories may exist, I would be more inclined to believe that most go through hardships, failures and many a plans gone wrong along the way!

It is very challenging to let go completely of one way of life for another. But when passion is the main source of power pushing that change, it can be used as a very good place to start from.

We ourselves our going through this very same challenge. As much as I admire the ones who can drop everything to kick-start their new life of passion, we decided it would be better if I kept working part time. I can assure you, there already has been a few difficult obstacles along the way!!!

Working part-time, I am making less money, but keeping our health coverage, one of the shackles in the Unites States I have hard time breaking! That being said I’m very greatful to have found the kind of job that lets me come and go as I please and keep a full medical insurance plan that costs me close to nothing.

But keep dreaming!

As we are traveling at this very moment through Costa Rica we visited a community that has been building a life from their passion of community, homesteading and sustainability. They are a perfect example of success from having followed their dreams and passions! If you get a chance to check it out, here is their info: Rancho Mastatal

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Over the course of 18 years, they have come accross quite a few obstacles but they never stopped reaching for their dream and here they are now a world renowned Sustainability Education Center.

I will soon be posting about our stay at Rancho Mastatal on my personal page @SenorCoconut, it was very inspiring and really confirmed that we’re not completely crazy, to follow our dream of building something similar in New York state!


My point is, don’t be afraid to tell EVERYONE about your passions and your dreams, this is how you can connect with others who share the same mindset and who will encourage you to continue on.

Just like the community around @homesteaderscoop, you too can follow your heart and make your passions and dreams a reality. Everything is possible and don’t forget it.

Until next time…
@SenorCoconut

PS: If you, or anyone you know would like to join us in building the kind of tribal lifestyle in self reliance I mentioned, please get in touch with me 😁!