Author: Homesteaders Co-op

Homesteaders – Living Naturally, Newsletter. 22nd May 2019

Another week has passed and the homesteading and natural living communities have been as busy as ever. It’s wonderful to see how they are growing, evolving and thriving from that early start back in mid 2017. It’s always been a busy, interactive and supportive community, even back when we started as Steemit Homesteaders. We were all small accounts and unable to give much financial support, yet if there is a community that understands that moral and personal support comes before money, it’s this one. I believe that this philosophy has been the reason the communities stay strong and retain so many members. Yes, we’ve branched out into multiple communities now, but are still connected and support one another.

Things happening in the community.

I love how our communities band together for a great cause. Over at @freedomtribe, with support from @theinnerblocks and @naturalmedicine, they are running a happiness challenge to raise funds for @LittleDisciples school and charity in Venezuela. The challenge is open until Wednesday 29th May, so there is still plenty of time to join in.

@steemonboarding is running a contest, with lots of prizes up for grabs, to encourage mass adoption of the Steem blockchain. This starts today and runs until 12th June. More details can be found here.

Other current contests and challenges which are running are:

Welcoming Newcomers

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@beckyanne71 has just joined Steem and is still trying to find her way around. Hopefully, we can help.

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Not quite so new here is @kindredacres, who joined us at the start of this year. They post about homesteading and wellness and have content on other platforms. Also an Etsy shop, woohoo!

Some highlights of the week

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The big C is often something which strikes fear into many a heart, but as independent researchers are finding, there are more than just the conventional ways to treat and prevent cancers. @artemislives shares a simple recipe which has helped her with early signs of skin cancer.

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@open3ye gives us the low down on composting in this detailed and helpful article.

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I’ve had a passing interest in Earthships for some time now, but it’s hard to find the time to research them. To the rescue came @eco-alex with a quick read which gives 10 reasons why he thinks they are awesome. It’s a concise article covering the main benefits of Earthships and how and why they work.

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If you fancy treating yourself you can’t go far wrong with @vegan.niinja‘s gluten free, vegan pancake recipe.

Thank you for stopping by. This week’s newsletter was brought to you by @minismallholding.

Sustainable, Handmade, Ethical Products – 20th May 2019

Featuring sustainable products and ethical services from https://homesteaderscoop.com

Support individuals and families who care about sustainability and leaving a healthier planet to our children’s children!


The Blue Dancer paper toy INSTANT Download illustration Diy – articulated paper doll – printable decoration pdf – for kids

The Blue Dancer paper toy INSTANT Download illustration Diy – articulated paper doll – printable decoration pdf – for kids

DIY is funny!!! This is a DIGITAL file of a nice dancer articulated paper doll from one of my original illustration. You can use this paper doll to decor your home, as bookmark, to make a awesome gift for your kids or your friends. A cute printable decor! In this listing there are a PDF file and a PNG file of printable sheet in A4 size. You can print it on your prefer paper (it works well with a 200/300 gr paper), cut it, fasten the pieces together (using brads if you want to have an…###

This product is available for STEEM, SBD & USD

brought to you by @silviabeneforti
browse all products in Paper
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silvia beneforti

Welcome to my shop where you can find my artworks and my handmade products for a nice lifestyle

Viterbo, Italy

The Blue Dancer paper toy INSTANT Download illustration Diy – articulated paper doll – printable decoration pdf – for kids

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Follow @silviabeneforti
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Distance Reiki Energy Work Session with a Master

Distance Reiki Energy Work Session with a Master

Modality: Distance Reiki is sometimes said to work according to the Hermetic Law of Similarity which holds that we are all connected. We are all expressions of the same fundamental energy forming the whole. How it works: Reiki is a 100% natural, non-invasive and safe method of energy balancing for stress reduction and relaxation. It is performed hands on or off depending on the client’s preference and involves no tissue manipulation. All healing is self-healing where the…###

This product is available for STEEM, SBD & USD

brought to you by @eaglespirit
browse all products in Services
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Eagle Medicine, LLC

Native American Natural Medicine

Colorado, United States (US)

Distance Reiki Energy Work Session with a Master

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Follow @eaglespirit
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Organic Holy Basil [Tulsi] Tincture 1 OZ

Organic Holy Basil [Tulsi] Tincture 1 OZ

Ocimum Tenuiflorum Also known as Tulsi, holy basil holds a sacred and revered space in homes in the Indian subcontinent and it is a very important herb in Ayurveda. It has been used widely as a home remedy and nourishing part of a healthy lifestyle for millennia. Holy basil has a number of functions and actions, due to its thoroughly nourishing nature. Because of its ability to reduce cortisol levels (stress hormone) and balance bodily functions (including blood sugar regulation), it is…###

This product is available for STEEM, SBD & USD

brought to you by @mountainjewel
browse all products in Tinctures
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Mountain Jewel

Permaculture Homestead Offering Plants & Medicines

Missouri, United States (US)

Organic Holy Basil [Tulsi] Tincture 1 OZ

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Follow @mountainjewel
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HSCO Featured Vendor | Meet “Mountain Jewel”.

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Hello again from @SenorCoconut,

This week, we’re going to ask a few questions to reflect the ethics and ideologies of one vendor at HSCO: Mountain Jewel. (@mountainjewel on steemit)!

Building a community is about clear communication and the willingness to support one another. As Homesteaders Co-op (HSCO) grows, we must keep in mind that the complexity and diversity of its moving parts may also expand, so here we are helping this free market stay running smooth together.

We found it essential for the good of everyone to highlight the vendors of the HSCO market place. Wouldn’t be nice to know the individuals and families offering their goods and services a little more?

Every week vendors are featured on the web site. As a community, we thought that every week, we should feature these vendors here on the Steem blockchain (@HomesteadersCoop) to give everyone that much more exposure.


It takes a village to raise a child, because when people help eachother life is easier for everyone involved.


Without further ado, here are a few question I’ve conjured up… let’s meet Mountain Jewel:

SenorCoconut: I have followed your journey on the steem blockchain since the beginning, and you’ve both been such an inspiration to me in terms of homesteading, self-reliance, and permaculture. Can you talk about what brought you to create Mountain Jewel?

Mouintain Jewel: First of all, thanks for having us on this interview! We love Homesteader’s Co-op and the community that is forming around it.

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Ini smiling with flowers of our favorite native, Paw Paw.

We created Mountain Jewel out of the inspiration of the abundance of the Earth – and how so many things of the earth like fruit, flowers, mushrooms and the interactions between all of the creatures really are jewel-like and should be honored and treasured as such. We want to highlight this in our increasingly earth-disconnected society. We’ve both been so touched by the Earth, we wanted to create a haven for this to be demonstrated so we could enjoy it and others can experience it. It’s also important to create sanctuaries for wildlife habitat and Mountain Jewel is this, too. It’s our goal to create perennial edible systems of abundance and diversity that really knock people’s socks off and which conjur up as Rumi says, that there are a million ways to kneel and kiss the ground! We’ve written quite a few articles on this topic and here are a few if people want to read further:
Our Journey to Becoming Homesteaders
Why We Homestead: Through Thick & Thin
Vision & Dreams Behind Mountain Jewel

SenorCoconut: I was just looking through your website, first of all, congratulations on your upcoming strawbale house build, I’m sure it will be tons of fun!!! Secondly, thank you for the mountain of free educational material on your blog. In relation to your natural medicines and plants found on HSCO’s marketplace, can you walk us through your thinking process and what kind of intentions you’ve set for these products? Feel free to talk about any other product or service you may be thinking of selling in the future.

Mountain Jewel: Thank you!! We are really excited about the build and it’s currently getting into full swing with the foundation of our straw bale home!

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Ini standing at the new house site on a ladder dreaming of the possibilities

With our homestead offerings, we again are showcasing and spreading the abundance of the Earth. All of our products are grown from the earth upon which we walk every day and many of them are self-replicating species that are naturally making more of themselves every year.

They are high vitality, nutritionally rich and easy to grow species (like berries, jerusalem artichokes & nettles) which we believe anyone can put in their backyard!

As our homestead expands and matures, so will our offerings. In fact, next weekend we’ll be vending at the Baker Creek Spring Planting Festival and selling berries galore (all of which naturally replicated themselves on our homestead), compost worms (again, reproducing like mad), among others. There is a theme here and it is that we do not live in a naturally scarce world, but we modern humans take part in an economy based upon scarcity. I believe it’s very healing to associate with things of the Earth that show us that this was not always the way and indeed isn’t the only way we must live upon this earth. Our products enable other people to grow these plants and enjoy and witness this abundance themselves.

SenorCoconut: I think we’ve agreed before that the pollution and destruction humanity creates, has put us on a dangerous path that seems to lead to human extinction, if we don’t change our ways “yesterday”. You guys obviously do a lot having an off grid homestead. If you don’t mind talking about it, Could you give us a couple examples of how you reduce your carbon footprint?

Mountain Jewel: You’re so right, we are not steering society in the right direction. This is a harsh reality that we have come to unerstand through study and experience and this has motivated us to be more concious in the ways we live out our lives.

We are ever mindful of the role that trees play in sequestering carbon, and about 15 acres of our land is and will continue to be woodland. This is important for more than just carbon cycles as it promotes and attracts a diversity of wildlife. In an area where it’s all too common to “slick off” (bulldoze) forests to create pastures that require inputs to maintain, preserving and tending a woodland is a powerful act.

We produce 100% renewable energy with solar panels. We didn’t want power companies making decisions for us, nor did we want to run generators so for the first 2 years we simply went without. Many of or tools (including a small chainsaw and strimmer) use battery power which allows us to manage and work on our proprety without petroluem inputs.

A major step we are actively taking is focusing on perennial agriculture. This means less soil distrubance, more carbon stored in the soil and more biomass sequestering carbon every year. Focusing on hardy adaptable species means less work for us and more ecosystem services that our land offers to the bioregion.

We seek to build with local, durable, and salvaged material whenever possibe to reduce the footproint our structures create in the production, transport, upkeep and disposal of these materials. In our upcoming house build, more that 90% of the wood is locally sourced from less than 20 miles away. This is in opposition to lumberyard wood that is grown in Canadian plantations and is dependent on chemicals and a large amount of fossil fuels that get it to consumers.

Our straw bales are grown locally (sequestering more carbon) and we will be protected by a combination of local subsoil (clay) and lime. Our building strategy is to build a stable, well insulated home with high thermal mass that won’t need much inputs in years to come. Build it once and build it right. We will also be harvesting and storing thousands of gallon of rain water harvested from the roof.

Obviously we are growing as much food as we can and eat almost 100% local meat from animals we’ve raised, bartered for or hunted. Our food purchaing choices are based on what is available locally, but we do certainly import organic staples.

Lastly is our effort to share our experiences, skills and knowledge with others so that more may live in alignement with Earth. We need all hands on deck here and the more information that is out there, the more opportunities we all have to create a better tomorrow.

SenorCoconut: Most I’ve talked with or heard speak of permaculture have their own “specialty”, something they like to practice more, something they’re better at. What do you think your favorite permaculture principles are and why?

Mountain Jewel: I agree, permaculture is such a broad ecosystem and most have a niche they fulfil. What comes up for me is always considering how one element can serve multiple funtions. When we plant or encourage “helper” plants like nitrogen fixers or dynamic accumulators, our choices are heavily influenced on how many functions each plant has. Take for instance the permaculture superstar comfrey. Not only does it accumulade a wide range of mineral in its leaves and stems, but it also is a great pollinator, invaluable medicince (for wounds, strains, bruises and broken bones), offers edible green for humans and animals and makes a great fertilizer. We are always finding ways to get as many uses out of the actions we take or elements we add into our systems.

We talk a lot about the principle of using small and slow solutions. Being an almost 100% human powered homestead, there are a lot of ways to appreciate this principle. No machines to dig for us, no tractors to plow, often no trucks to move loads of materials. We are thinking long term so we start small and set succession in motion, we (and others) will reap the rewards for years to come. A few clover seeds scattered before spring rains ripples into a much greater effect of improving soil, attracting pollinators and creating a permanent living mulch. Taking our tasks bit by bit make the mammoth task we are undertaking possible.

SenorCoconut: You have a wonderful internship program, giving people the opportunity to learn to care for a place like the one you’ve built. You’ve said that your homestead is dedicated to living in alignment with natural rhythms, calling it a Center for Earth Connection, can you please tell us more about what this means to you?

Mountain Jewel: What a great question! Yes! I brought this up a bit in the earlier questions and that is the notion of Remembering Abundance. There have been moments of pure joy when I am around the sheer abundance of the earth- think of a plant at maturity giving off thousands of seeds. Before that it was a beautiful flower in bloom and bees and other pollinators enjoyed it, and we did, too! When we align with these natural rhythms we can remember this for ourselves and embody it, sharing it with others and healing the wounds of scarcity – the fact that many humans work all of their lifeblood energy into making money to simply live upon this earth.

With increasing disconnection and basically “living on top of the earth” with the green “backdrop” of unknown plants, modern humans do well to learn the language of the earth once more. Through learning plants and differentiating that green backdrop a species at a time, through picking and eating a fresh fruit warmed by the sun, sleeping with the sounds of coyotes howling, frogs sounding, waking up to birdsong, breathing and drinking pure air and water, these are all connective activities and they balance out and heal our disconnection from the earth. We want to provide a space for people to do these things and remember what a delight it is to connect with the earth and how healing it is in its simplicity. That’s our Center for Earth Connection. Along with all of that, we practically teach the skills associated with Permaculture (how to live in connection with the earth; what patterns and activities are beneficial), Natural Building, Gardening, Perennial Agriculture, Wildcrafting and Foraging, Herbalism and more. We, as a species, once were very connected with the earth and these are tools to be connected once more. It’s an empowering lifelong process – one that brings much joy!

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Wren in the woods connecting with nature in New Mexico, one of our favorite places.

With the internship we are hoping on sharing some of the wonderul ways we can work with the Earth. We have both learned a lot from others and we believe there is no substitute for hands-on learning. The skills mentioned above are absolutely necessary for a sustainable society and more people need to embody them. As the homestead evolves, there will be more and more for folks to see, touch, taste and experiece and the goal is to feed souls through inspiration and empower through education.


I want to thank you for taking precious time out of your day to answer these questions, you make me dream… what I mean is that you confirm that my vision of creating a sustainability education center is possible (and not completely crazy 😲).

Education and empowerment are both really great aspects of your work on your homesteading journey. Lately I have been on a trip to reconnect with the earth and it’s been very eye opening, so I really love that you’re on that path and teaching others about it.

Thank you @Mountainjewel, for letting us have a peak into your life, your answers were more than inspiring to me 😁, the best of luck with everything you do and enjoy the strawbale house build!


For those of you who would like to look at her shop at HSCO here a quick link: Mountain Jewel!


Thank you so much for reading and stay tuned for next week’s featured vendor… Same time, same place!

@SenorCoconut

PS: Special thanks to @Riverflows for the graphics on that first image at the top of the post 💚 and of course @Homesteaderscoop for being an awesome community!

Homesteaders – Living Naturally, Newsletter. 15th May 2019

Welcome back to another newsletter. For all those who celebrated Mother’s Day over the weekend, I hope you had a lovely one, whether it was being pampered by your children (human or not) or spending quality time with your own mothers.

Things happening in the community.

Have you ever thought of selling your ethically produced products? Here’s how the Homesteaders Co-op has been going these last few months with getting sales for its vendors. It’s a community effort which is blossoming.

It looks like it’s been a while since @pennsif has had a chance to update on the @altlife account. He’s been busy with work on the promotion and reporting of what is happening on the Steem blockchain. Thank you @pennsif for all your hard work in this area.

The @ecotrain is as busy as always. The last challenge on making use of waste and abundance has closed with a round up of all the posts. A perfect place to get lots of ideas on dealing with those excesses. The new Question of the Week is now in motion and entries can be made until 22nd May.

@naturalmedicine‘s fortnightly challenge is still open until 17th May, so if you were planning on an entry, there is still time.

Also, For the Love of Comments is still open for entries until Friday. This time there are chances of prizes for all, no matter what your SP is. The delegation prize will still go to someone with less than 500 SP, so if you know anyone who deserves it (yourself included), drop a comment on the post.

Welcoming Newcomers

omni.jfif

I’m excited to introduce @omnivori, who arrived on Steem last month. They have a website and produce grubs for pet food. If you can stomach the idea, they are looking into food-grade grubs for people consumption too! I hope you can find some time to look at what they are doing and give their latest post some love.

Some highlights of the week

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Bokashi composting seems to be getting quite popular lately. If you’re wanting to learn more about this composting method @dynamicgreentk will help out with his post here.

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Sometimes as growers of food plants, we can forget that flowers play an important role too. @lizziesworld tells us a bit about how useful alyssum can be in the vegetable garden.

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@cryptohustlin is starting a conversation on intentional communities. Something I think many readers might find interesting or have some thoughts to contribute to.

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@homesteadhippy is at it again with a tempting strawberry glazed scone recipe.

Thank you for stopping by. This week’s newsletter was brought to you by @minismallholding.

Sustainable, Handmade, Ethical Products – 13th May 2019

Featuring sustainable products and ethical services from https://homesteaderscoop.com

Support individuals and families who care about sustainability and leaving a healthier planet to our children’s children!


Lavender Dream Pillow – Cheerful Mushrooms

Lavender Dream Pillow – Cheerful Mushrooms

This generously sized sachet is filled with dried lavender harvested from our gardens in later summer 2018. No fillers or other additives, just pure natural lavender. Herb filled Sachets are an old fashioned way to naturally scent and freshen closed spaces. Tuck this lavender sachet into a drawer, closet, suitcase or vehicle and enjoy the calming aroma of lavender every time you open that space. For a peaceful sleep tuck a sachet underneath your pillow. Benefits: Lavender is naturally… ###

This product is available for STEEM, SBD & USD

brought to you by @walkerland
browse all products in Handmade
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Walkerland

Wildcrafted Natural Creations from the Walkerland Homestead

New Brunswick, Canada

Lavender Dream Pillow – Cheerful Mushrooms

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Earthship Chronicles – EBook:

Earthship Chronicles – EBook:

The magical tale of a man who self built his self sufficient luxurious earthship home with no experience or training. If you are thinking about one day building your own eco-home or want to live off-grid and be self-sufficient, then this book is written for you! Welcome to the start of this journey and sharing. This Book is about many things. It is a fantastic learning opportunity as I explain the most important concepts and ideas you need to know so you can understand how Earthship… ###

This product is available for STEEM, SBD & USD

brought to you by @eco-alex
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Alex leeor

Making this world a better place

United Kingdom, United Kingdom (UK)

Earthship Chronicles – EBook:

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Hand dyed shibori wall-hanging

Hand dyed shibori wall-hanging

Hand made and hand dyed wall-hanging, deep blue and white shibori style. I used a nice, quite thick recycled cotton and it’s mounted on bambu. Approx. 52x40cm, 20×15 inch. It weighs around 50 grams. ###

This product is available for STEEM, SBD & USD

brought to you by @trucklife-family
browse all products in Handmade
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Weave To Empower

Womens Co Op creating natural and sustainable products off-grid

Granada, Spain

Hand dyed shibori wall-hanging

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HSCO Featured Vendor of the Week | Meet “Elamental Earth”.

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Hello, it’s @SenorCoconut once again,

Today, we’re asking a few questions to reflect the ethics and ideologies of one vendor at HSCO: Elamental Earth (@ElAmental on steemit)!

Building a community is about clear communication and the willingness to support one another. As Homesteaders Co-op grows, we must keep in mind that the complexity and diversity of its moving parts may also expand, so here we are helping this free market stay running smooth together.

We found it essential for the good of everyone to highlight the vendors of the HSCO market place. Wouldn’t be nice to know the individuals and families offering their goods and services a little more?

Every week vendors are featured on the web site. As a community, we thought that every week, we should feature these vendors here on the Steem blockchain (@HomesteadersCoop) to give everyone that much more exposure.


It takes a village to raise a child, because when people help eachother life is easier for everyone involved.


This interview a bit differently as it is in video format.. yeah DTube!!!! But for those of you who aren’t into watching videos I have highlighted and paraphrased @ElAmental‘s answers below.

Without further ado, here are a few question I’ve conjured up… let’s meet Elamental Earth: Click pic or link below to play

▶️ DTube

Question 1 (0:30 sec):
Tribe, Music, Earth Deeds, Gardening and I see a lot of art coming from you too. Can you tell us what drives you to create so much?

Tapping into esoteric realm for ispiration, I have been creative since a young age… once it’s time to create, it’s time to cteate!

Question 2 (4:30 min):
Looking through your steemit blog one can see you care tremendously for our planet. In your store bio at homesteaders co-op, there’s mention of your products being created using the most eco-friendly processes available, can you explain to the audience why this is important to you please?

We use organic unbleached cotton… and soon we’ll use hemp. We must know the importance of herbal dyes because we are transdermal creatures.

Leading by example, creating in ways that aren’t damaging to the planet, the community or the people that are interacting with the products.

I want there to be nothing but positive energy influence and substance into all my creations.

Question 3 (7:20 min):
I would like to talk a little bit about Earth deeds. It seems to be an initiative that can influence a lot of people to be more eco-friendly. Could you tell us about what “Earth Deeds” is to you? How did it come to fruition and perhaps what were your intentions when it all started?

The idea of #Earthdeeds started when I was fixing a flat tire, using a plug. The point was to avoid the “trickle down domino effect” of the factory fabricating a new tire when this one can be fixed instead of being discarded.

Posting about the things we do to help the environment influences others to report on what they do to save the earth.

The ultimate goal for #Earthdeeds is to increase the planet healing effect of what you’re already doing for Earth.

Question 4 (11:20 min):
I’ve seen some wonderful “how to” videos on growing cannabis, you make it look easy. As the world is slowly getting out of thinking this topic is taboo, can you please inform us on how cannabis (under its many different forms) can change our world? What kind of environmental impact could it have?

Growing cannabis is more difficult than it seems, there’s a lot to know and it is recommended to apprentice under a “Master Grower”.

“Backyard Cannabis” is a series that was started recently and it is a sort of a “growing for dummies” video guide.

Hemp to reverse the green house effect and save the wolrd by Jack Hairer, explains the whole idea behind hemp and how it could benefit the planet.

In short hemp/cannabis can save the world.

Question 5 (19:20 min):
You’ve used the term “eco-conscious practitioner“, can you tell us what that is and how it reflects to your everyday life?

It’s about living a life and having daily actions that are allined with environmental activism.

I don’t litter and sometimes I intentionally go out to pick up trash, I recycle.

Money from returned bottles goes into a water tree to have a reverse osmosis 9 stage remineralised water.

Being an eco practitioner simply means living your life in the best way possible that helps the earth. Being aware of how your everyday life effects the environmen, improving the effects and decreasing your carbon foot print.


We don’t have to change the whole world, start with our own world…. once a lot of people’s world change they wil connect and we will change the whole world!

@ElAmental


I may have buchered that last thing you said in the video a little but that’s what I got out of it and I do believe it is true, the most important change starts right at home!!!

Thank you for taking this inteview, it was great to have a peak into your life. You are definitely a Eco Warrior… I know a lot of people talk the talk, but judging from your blog and everything you do with Erth Tribe and Erth Deeds we can also see that you walk the walk too!!!

Keep up the good fight…


Please do have a look at what @ElAmental is doing, through his blog and if you like to have eco-concious items in your wardrobe do have a look at his HSCO Shop

Thank you for reading and/or watching, I sincerely hope you found some inspiration for sustainability 💚. Have a good day and untill next time…

Homesteaders – Living Naturally, Newsletter. 8th May 2019

This week feels like it’s been quieter than usual on the posting front. Perhaps it’s getting busy in the real world for homesteaders and gardeners. Whatever you’re all doing, I hope you are fruitful!

Things happening in the community.

Well, @naturalmedicine certainly seems busy at the moment, so if the activity is low in your feed, perhaps see what they are up to. There is @musing, meditating, contest giveaways and much more.

@ecotrain has a new popup question and there is still a little time to get entries in for the abundance/waste challenge.

In regular contests, we have @wildhomesteading‘s weekly challenge for sharing how you’ve been gardening while working with nature.

Welcoming Newcomers

sap.jfif

A new arrival at the beginning of this year was @sappergardener, who has posted again after a long break. I hope we continue to see more from them.

Some highlights of the week

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First up @digitaldan teaches us a bit about leatherworking in this step by step on how he made a knife sheath.

sage.jfif

@sagescrub have been adding spring flowers to their gardens. I never realised what an amazing choice of unusual flowers there are for adding some colours to the garden as it comes out of winter.

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@byronmushrooms give some simple, yet effective tips on giving cuttings the best possible chances of rooting when placed directly in the ground.

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From @jennimorrillo comes a sweet/salty dish of Creole Cheesecake. Now I just need to figure out what Creole cheese is.

Thank you for stopping by. This week’s newsletter was brought to you by @minismallholding.

Sustainable, Handmade, Ethical Products – 5th May 2019

Featuring sustainable products and ethical services from https://homesteaderscoop.com

Support individuals and families who care about sustainability and leaving a healthier planet to our children’s children!


Hand dyed shibori cotton coat

Hand dyed shibori cotton coat

This hand dyed shibori japanese style jacket/coat is made in a nice thick recycled cotton that I dyed in pale grey with details of darker grey. It has big pockets and wide, straight sleeves. 90cm long. Handmade and hand dyed by me. ###

Hand dyed shibori cotton coat is available for STEEM, SBD & USD

brought to you by @trucklife-family
browse all products in Handmade
###

Weave To Empower

Womens Co Op creating natural and sustainable products off-grid

Granada, Spain

Hand dyed shibori cotton coat

###
Follow @trucklife-family
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Medicine Card Reading

Medicine Card Reading

If you would like a personal Medicine Card reading: Send 10 STEEM/ 5 SBD for the FIRST 30 minutes. The price will increase in 30 minute increments. More cards takes more time. The average reading takes 1 hour plus. (A 1 Card Reading can be done in 30 minutes) Choose a deck and spread: Animal Spirit (1, 2, 3, 4, or 13 card spread), Chakra Wisdom (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or 7 card spread), or Mystical Shaman Oracle (1, 3, or 4 card spread.) Each person is given a special one-on-one… ###

Medicine Card Reading is available for STEEM, SBD & USD

brought to you by @eaglespirit
browse all products in Services
###

Eagle Medicine, LLC

Native American Natural Medicine

Colorado, United States (US)

Medicine Card Reading

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Men’s BEER SOAP with Barber Shoppe Fragrance Oil and Activated Charcoal

Men’s BEER SOAP with Barber Shoppe Fragrance Oil and Activated Charcoal

Men’s BEER SOAP with Barber Shoppe Fragrance Oil and Activated Charcoal Beer Soap is made with real beer and combined with a wonderful blend of oils to pamper your man’s skin. The Barber Shoppe fragrance enhances this soap for that fresh, groomed feeling. Go ahead…. spoil your man today! This listing is for “One” BARBER SHOPPE BEER Artisan Soap The soaps are hand cut and vary in weight, approximately 4.50 – 5.50 oz each. This beautiful handmade bar includes the following… ###

Men’s BEER SOAP with Barber Shoppe Fragrance Oil and Activated Charcoal is available for STEEM, SBD & USD

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Sunscapes Soap Shop

Welcome to Sunscapes Soap Shop where we offer you handmade, quality products to enhance your lifestyle.

New York, United States (US)

Men’s BEER SOAP with Barber Shoppe Fragrance Oil and Activated Charcoal

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A Gift Economy: Generosity on HSCO

How many of you work hard to make a living, but still give of your own time, money and resources to help those who might need it? How many of you gift your neighbours excess produce to make them smile or to save them money with no expectation of return? How many of you have given a gift and felt that warm inner glow inside that comes when we act from a intention of kindness and generosity?

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If I know folk, many of you! I refuse to buy into the narrative that everyone is looking after themselves. I see generosity all around me. I choose to focus on that, rather than stinginess and meanness. We become, after all, what we think – and we create our world from seeds of intention.

Speaking of seeds, I recieved a gift from @sagescrub in the post this week. I’d noticed that some of his seeds were offered for FREE. Huh? Isn’t it a marketplace – you know, the kind where people make money from their ethical and sustainable goods? Why free? Well – as Homesteaders Co-op explains on their website:

Because we are operating different than other marketplaces that prioritize profit over people. We are putting people in front of profit. A marketplace that wants to squeeze as much profit as possible out of their vendors and their customers would never encourage gifts unless they were sure it would mean more money for them.

Did you know that some vendors offer gifts on Homesteader’s Co-Op? @quochy, for example, offers a free e-book on setting up a worm compost bin. Check that out here.

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You can also find seeds that @sagescrub offers. I was quite lucky because he went that little bit further and threw in some bonus seeds for me. Sadly, it’s the southern hemisphere, and I have to wait for Spring! But those herbal seeds are going to make a difference in my life. You see, by planting more herbs and food plants, I am able to gain a little more food and home medicine sovereignty. It’s going to be more easy on my pocket so I can spend more at Homesteaders Co-Op. AND I can collect the seeds from them and pay them forward to someone else. A world of flowers, food and herbs? What could go wrong?

Homesteaders Co-Op offers a hybrid gift economy:

Hybrid because our vendors need to make money for the hard work to create their products and offer their services and I don’t want to take that away or devalue it. Unfortunately most of us cannot envision ourselves living in a world where all exchanges are gifted because we are so entrenched in a culture that demands money to operate. But I do hope that we can explore together what benefits come to us not as individuals, but as a community, when we operate in a gift economy. How might this inform the future that we want to build for ourselves and our children?

When you click on the ‘Gifts’ section (this is kept separate so as not to distract from the main vendor’s products – remember, HSCO was designed to help small ethical vendors make a living!) and click on the gift, it comes up with a box just like this:

This allows us to think about the value of the gift in terms of it’s value outside a more common fiat or steem economy. What is our relationship to this product? How might it improve our lives? It also stops that gimme gimme gimme, because it’s free – allowing vendors to decide whether the person is genuine or just grabbing an opportunity. As the site explains, vendors should have the right to gift to who they want. They should be able to make a living, as well as have the opportunity to be generous when and if they choose.

The nice thing about this too is that it helps build community relationships, and that’s pretty lovely – both on the blockchain, and in the wider community of non-steem users.

Because that’s really what Homesteaders Co-Op is about – putting people over profit.

Do you take part in a gift economy?

How important is the value of generosity in your life?

Wild Homesteading and Business Advice Newsletter – May 2019

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Ready to start growing your homesteading business? What about learning how working with nature gives you more freedom as a homesteader? This month’s Wild Homesteading and Business Advice Newsletter by Daron with @wildhomesteading is all about 4 business podcasts/sites that can help you manage/grow an online business and how working with nature can provide you more freedom as a homesteader.

Ready? Let’s dive in!

4 Business Podcasts that You Should Check Out

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Learning from these podcasts has let my business grow steadily since launching back in November. This chart shows how my email list has grown since launching. This gives my business a great foundation to build on.

Before I started Wild Homesteading I spent a lot of time researching what it meant to run an online business in an ethical way that focused on content marketing and creating value for your customer.

I will talk more about content marketing in a future newsletter, but basically content marketing focuses around letting your content do the marketing for you. I like this approach to marketing and I think it is much more ethical than a lot of marketing approaches since it only works if you create content that is of a high value to your audience.

But when I started this was all new to me and there is so much to learn about running an online business. Here are the 4 business podcasts/sites that helped me get started and that I still listen to.

Amy Porterfield – Marketing Made Easy Podcast:

  • Amy’s podcast provides a lot of great advice especially around email lists and online courses.

Pat Flynn – Smart Passive Income:

  • Pat’s podcast is broader in topics than Amy’s but in many ways very similar. Lots of great interviews and advice episodes focused on helping entrepreneurs.

ProBlogger – Darren Rowse:

  • If you are wanting to start a blog or already have a blog but struggling to get traffic and to make an income from your blog then Darren’s podcast and site are a great place to start. The podcast has not been updated for a few months but the archives are filled with great episodes and the blog is still being updated regularly.

The Creative Penn Podcast – Joanna Penn

  • This one is a bit different from the others since Joanna is focused on helping independent authors. So, if you are an author or an inspiring author this is a fantastic podcast for you. But Joanna tends to focus on the business side of being a successful author and I have learned a lot from her podcast despite only being an inspiring author at this time.

There are more great podcasts out there but these 4 are a great place to start. My business has been steadily growing since starting last November and these are the main sites I have used to learn what I know.

Do you have a business podcast you like to listen to? Please share in the comments!

Gain Freedom as a Homesteader by Working with Nature

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This is the front of my homestead that visitors see when parking. Despite this just being the start of my 3rd year on this site by working with nature I have already seen dramatic improvements. I can’t wait to see what the future holds!

If you follow my own site, you know that I stress the importance of working with nature on your homestead or in your garden. I’m driven by a deep desire to protect the natural world but working with nature also provides you more freedom and independence.

What sort of freedom?

A big one is the freedom from dependence on chemical inputs such as fertilizer and herbicides/pesticides. While these are bad for the environment and your health they also result in less freedom for you as a homesteader.

Each year you use them your soil becomes more degraded making you more dependent on these chemical inputs. This means each year you have to spend more money just to run in place.

Or perhaps you buy animal feed. Now imagine you are able to work with nature to grow more food for your animals on your homestead.

I could go on and on, but the main point is that each of these inputs make you dependent on products that are often made by a big corporation or business. If they raise their prices you are stuck paying it.

But nature does not raise its prices—in fact overtime the “cost” of working with nature can actually go down as your soil and the rest of your homestead become healthier, more productive, and more in balance each year.

Working with nature is about investing in your land and your homestead for the long haul.

So here is my task for you. Think about your homestead and any offsite inputs you currently use to keep it going. Now pick one to start working towards eliminating or reducing by working with nature.

Say you want to reduce the chicken feed you buy. Try gathering some edible weeds like dandelions and toss them to the chickens. That one small step can result in more freedom for you as a homesteader by reducing the amount of feed you need to buy.

For my homestead my chief offsite input is mulching material. While I can’t eliminate that input at this time when I plant new growing areas I’m always making sure to add plants that I can chop-and-drop or that work as a living mulch so I can grow my mulch onsite instead of bringing it in from offsite.

While I can get mulch for free this still takes time and energy. The more I can reduce this the more freedom I will have. Especially in terms of time.

Finally, while your trying new ways to work with nature on your homestead make sure to take part in my weekly contest where I ask people to share what they are doing to work with nature. Check out my first announcement post for more information and watch for the upcoming contest announcement next Tuesday. The contest runs weekly every Tuesday through Thursday.

Until Next Month

I hope you have enjoyed the first monthly Wild Homesteading and Business Advice Newsletter! Do you have something you would like me to talk about next month? Leave a comment with your topic request–just keep it related to wild homesteading or business.

Until next month keep homesteading and good luck with your business!


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Follow me for more posts all about homesteading, working with nature, and growing your own food: @wildhomesteading

And check out my blog – www.wildhomesteading.com for weekly in-depth posts on working with nature to grow your own food and start/build your homestead.