Wild Mustard Seeds

$4.00

26.68 STEEM
5.534 SBD

I accept these currencies:

USD STEEM SBD BTC ETH

I accept Credit Card and PayPal as a form of payment for USD. A PayPal account is not required to make credit card payments.

I am open to bartering. Learn more
Category: Store tag:

Overview

I have a great affinity for mustard plants after having spent time with the feral population of wild Mustard here in Southern Oregon. These plants are quite hardy and in this climate they continue growing right through the winter under the snow and through the frosts. The Mustards that had self sown in the previous summer/fall slowly grow their large leaves and then begin blooming in the spring providing abundant firework displays of brilliant yellows, right along side the dandelion blooms, when not much else is blooming. Among the first flowers of the season, they are greatly appreciated by the pollinators.

Wild Mustard – Brassica kaber

Life cycle: Annual / Ease of propagation: Easy / Hardiness zone: 5-9

I have a great affinity for mustard plants after having spent time with the feral population of wild Mustard here in Southern Oregon. These plants are quite hardy and in this climate they continue growing right through the winter under the snow and through the frosts. The Mustards that had self sown in the previous summer/fall slowly grow their large leaves and then begin blooming in the spring providing abundant firework displays of brilliant yellows, right along side the dandelion blooms, when not much else is blooming. Among the first flowers of the season, they are greatly appreciated by the pollinators.

Brassica kaber is similar to Brassica rapa, but Brassica kaber’s leaf growth patter is more dense and the leaves have petioles, or leaf stems, where Brassica rapa’s do not. This population of Mustard is quite resilient, as most weeds are, and I have not witnessed any signs of aphid predation or disease. The wild Mustard is suitable to all soil types and these particular seeds were collected from plants thriving in heavy clay soil.

What attracted me to this wild Mustard was their abundant source of dark mustard seeds. Surprising to me the seeds are both sizeable and quite peppery! I appreciate the condiment in my cooking. It was not too difficult to collect a sizeable amount of seeds once the plants had gone to seed and dried. I watched for the first signs of seed pods cracking open and harvested all the dried or nearly dried branches into a bin to cure. Following that the pods were crushed and chaff was screened and then winnowed off of the seeds producing a beautiful range of rust to dark brown/black mustard seeds.

As far as the leaves go, they are sturdy, healthy and dark green and are sure to provide ample minerals and nutrients into your diet. I enjoy the leaves cooked in stews and sauteed greens.

Mustard seeds and leaves, when applied externally produce heat that can help reduce inflammation, especially with regards to the lungs, as in pneumonia and bronchitis. Bruised mustard seeds can be added to a foot bath to help fight off colds or headaches.

There are many more medicinal uses of Mustard seed and leaves, too many to list here.

“The Mohicans bound the bruised leaves of the black mustard in place to relieve both toothaches and headaches. Other tribes found that grinding the dark hot seeds of the same species into powder, then sniffing this into the nostrils, helped dry up head colds. Mustard seeds were also ground by our early ancestors in this New World and made into a paste by mixing them with something such as bear lard, hog fat, mutton tallow, beef lard, or a similar domestic shortening. This was applied and bound where its heat could do the most good for such ailments as lumbago rheumatism and bad strains.”
– Bradford Angier, Field Guide to Medicinal Wild Plants

“It relieves congestion of various organs by drawing the blood to the surface, as in head affections, and is of service in the alleviation of neuralgia and other pains and spasms.”
– Maud Grieve, A Modern Herbal

Sowing Instructions

Direct sow seeds ¼- ½ inch deep in late winter / early spring (or late summer for fall crop) and keep soil moist until germination occurs.

References

Barter

✅ I am open to bartering with other Vendors
✅ I am open to bartering with Customers

My Notes RE Bartering:

We are interested in bartering for organic or homegrown/homespun yarn, or other homegrown natural fibers that we can use for natural dying. We would also barter for honey, perennial fruit, nut, medicinal seeds or plants we don't have on hand. Other offers will also be considered.

You may scroll down to the Product Enquiry form to inquire about bartering with them and possibly setting up arrangements for a trade. All barters are facilitated privately between the parties involved. Barter at your own risk.

Shipping

Shipping To These Countries

United States (US)

Shipping Policy

  • Usually ships within 3-5 business days.
  • We ship domestically within United States.

Returns & Exchanges

  • All sales of seeds are final once they have been shipped.
  • However, for damaged seeds or seeds with poor germination, we may choose to offer replacement or store credit at our discretion.

Product Enquiry

Your personal data will be used to support your experience throughout this website, to manage access to your account, and for other purposes described in our privacy policy

Reviews

Reviews

There are no reviews yet.

Be the first to review “Wild Mustard Seeds”

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *